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#5 ARE CLOTHES FRESH OUT OF THE WASHER ALWAYS CLEAN?

Your clothes may come out of the washer looking stain-free and smelling fresh, but does that always mean they’re clean? Sadly, no….

Laundry detergent manufacturers often run commercials encouraging consumers to wash with lukewarm or even cold water to lower energy costs. While this may be smart from an economic or even environmental standpoint, it won’t necessarily kill pathogenic microorganisms.

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#4 DO MULTI SURFACE CLEANERS REALLY WORK?

Housekeeping involves cleaning and sanitizing all sorts of different surfaces. While some products are considered “multi-surface cleaners,” they do not necessarily offer optimal results on all surfaces and on all types of stains.

The good news is that some multi surface cleaners are more versatile than others because they are formulated to efficiently clean most surfaces such as floors, walls, windows, and appliances. Their main role is to remove visible dirt on surfaces, often prior to sanitizing or disinfecting.

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#3 THERE’S GERMS ON YOUR SCREEN

Did you know that there are 18 times more bacteria on a touch screen than on a toilet handle?

That includes smart phones, tablets, video games, ATMs, grocery store self-checkout machines, self-service kiosks at fast food outlets, airport check-in kiosks and even touch screens in cars. If it’s a touch screen, you can be fairly sure it’s crawling with thousands of germs! What’s more, these microscopic bacteria could be carrying viruses such as E. coli. C. difficile or even MRSA.

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#2 CO-WORKERS MAKING YOU SICK?

Your co-worker is doubled over with another coughing fit. Should you be worried?

After all, anyone who works in an office knows just how hard is to stay healthy during cold and flu season. It certainly doesn’t help when co-workers show up sniffing and sneezing. Fortunately, coughing or sneezing does not necessarily pose a high risk of contagion for others. That said, there are certain hygiene measures you should take to avoid catching whatever is going around.

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#1 SURFACTANTS VS BIOSURFACTANTS

Surfactants (short for “surface active agents”) are compounds that lower the surface (or interfacial) tension between two surfaces.

They are amphiphilic substances (both lipophilic and hydrophilic) that make cleaning and rinsing fabrics and surfaces easier. The surfactant is the main active ingredient in most cleaning products, and serves two primary roles: First, it helps to “wet” the surface (i.e. improve contact with the surface, even if it’s dirty and greasy). Second, it emulsifies oils and fats.

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